FLAC to digital

What converter do you use to bring your audio cds to FLAC?

I like EAC (exact audio copy) as it’s free, easy, and works well

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do you have a link?

http://www.exactaudiocopy.de/

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Copy. I am having my parent join the Forum. Izzy is (my parent) is my biggest influence on music. Im still trying to influence to join the forum.

I use db power amp

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MusicBee…

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As mentioned previously, EAC is quite good. If you’re on a linux-based system Whipper is a good alternative.

I have tried using EAC but can only seem to rip to WAV format. How do you convert to FLAC? Even when I go for compressed format comes out WAV. Any help is much appreciated.

You can follow this guide to setup EAC correctly

https://wiki.hydrogenaud.io/index.php?title=EAC_and_FLAC#Configuration

@Towa Thanks.

I did eventually find that guide and managed to get it to work. The interesting thing I found after ripping the same CD with Windows 10 Media Player, EAC and with Foobar2000 is that all the rips sounded exactly the same. The only difference I found When comparing a selected track was that Windows Media Player was 2kbs larger than the Foobar2000 rip and 1 kbs larger than EAC. Using my Elex I could not find a difference using the three different programs. The only thing that stood out was that Windows Media Player provides the cover art when ripping where Foobar2000 didn’t and EAC you have to pay a fee to get that option. I originally started using EAC because everyone was raving about it compared to other programs. I guess I am a bit disappointed as I was hoping to hear a difference. I guess I learned my lesson. However, it was entertaining getting everything working and comparing them.

Well, EAC, if configured correctly, ensures bit-perfect audio rips, which may be important if you want to archive your CD’s audio without any audible errors in the rip even if the CD is scratched.

Also, EAC can download cover art from Metadata services like musicbrainz.

The last thing I would want after ripping an album is to go back and re-rip due to any audible pops or skips due to the ripping software lacking features that EAC includes to mitigate such issues.

That may be. I was using a new cd and did set up based on everything I scrounged from the internet. It may be more beneficial to scratched or damaged cds. It may also depend on different recordings as I only have tested it with this one cd. I believe that cover art service costs money. However, the program is free so $7.99 for cover art isn’t that much I guess. I just not a fan of that kind of micro transaction even if it is a one time payment. Seem odd that they can’t include the information that is on the disc where as Windows Media Player can. I can understand why people use the program I just was expecting a significant increase compared what I was already using is all.

Never paid any money for cover art download from EAC. I am not familiar with the guide that you followed, but you should not have selected the GD3 Plugin (Gracenote?) when installing/setting up EAC, which requires a fee to download metadata. The cuetools plugin, which you should have installled and later selected in the metadata configuration window, scrapes discogs and musicbrainz sites, and downloads cover art from the latter if found (for free).

Thank you for the information. I doubled checked and ran it with your suggested plugin. However, it still did not provide me with any cover art. It could be that the band is not popular enough. I will have to try another cd, perhaps one that is more mainstream will be more successful. Once again thank you for your suggestions and help.

dBPoweramp and call it a day. It’s a fantastic little ripper with a lot of funtionality and excellent integration into Windows for quality of life features in your music file management.

BTW the cover art integration is one of the strong points of the app.